All posts tagged: Meridian

Looking backwards

As the Covid-19 lockdown bites, the ability to get out of the house has been curtailed. Consequently, images from an unfettered past are seen from a new perspective. A couple of years ago I worked on a project photographing along the length of the Greenwich Meridian as it passes through Lincolnshire. I started just north of the Humber estuary. Though not strictly in Lincolnshire, the Meridian first hits land in this coastal part of Yorkshire before entering into Lincolnshire. Using a series of 42 images I describe the passage of this notional line across 75 miles of its journey. I took many more than the 42 images I’ll eventually use. I was helped considerably by Phil Cosker who spent time with me editing down the images to the curated 42 I shall be showing. But where to show them? With the Corona virus raging across the country galleries are closed. So what to do? A while back I produced an on-line gallery of sort, now removed, which was an attempt at showing the work virtually. At …

Meridian landfall, Holderness. A Line Runs Through It, PDBarton

A Line Runs Through It

For the purpose of navigation, the earth is notionally divided into Eastern and Western Hemispheres. The line which divides those hemispheres is the Prime Meridian Leaving the North Pole the line travels towards the South Pole. The first land it reaches is on the East coast of England, just above the Humber estuary in the ancient coastal area of Holderness, an area of chronic coastal erosion. The  Meridian project, entitled “A line runs through it “ involved travelling along this line from landfall in Holderness in the North, south across the Humber to the seaside towns in North East Lincolnshire and onwards into Lincolnshire, passing through the Lincolnshire Wolds and the fenlands around Boston and Holbeach, and finally to the Lincolnshire/ Cambridgeshire border. The whole distance travelled from Landfall in the North to the Cambridgeshire border in the South is 121.4Km ( 75.43 miles). The Images were captured along the line and to either side over the space of 6 months. These images are bound together by nothing other than their geographic proximity to a …