All posts tagged: Book Reviews

Beuty in decay

Book Review: Beauty in Decay II

Title: Beauty in Decay II. Photographer: RomanyWG. Essays: Polly Chillery. Reference: ISBN 978-1-908211-10-1. First published:  2012 by Carpet Bombing Culture. Web site: www.carpetbombingculture.co.uk. Size:267mm x 267mm x 24mm square format. I admit to having esoteric taste in photography. For example, I have always liked images of old buildings in decay. There is something about faded grandeur, that evanescence, which haunts me. Perhaps it stems from my time spent in inner city Birmingham in the 60’s working to rebuild the city after the war years. Many buildings were demolished: domestic; commercial; and governmental. I was able to wander among them before demolition. In the quiet time, before they died. Or, perhaps it was my time spent as a building surveyor where it was my job to inspect old buildings. I have been inside of many fascinating structures. So, you can see why a book depicting images discovered whilst urban exploring might fascinate me. This book doesn’t disappoint. It has dozens of images, many filling the whole page, taken in many countries. The subject matter ranges from grand domestic to industrial. Unfortunately, …

Once a year: Homer Sykes

Once a year: Homer Sykes

Photographer: Homer Sykes Book title: Once a year. Published: 2016 Size: 240mm X 295mm X 25mm (Portrait format) Weight: 1572g Pages: 160 pages of images – some double spread. Plus 42 pages of explanatory text on images. ISBN: 978-1-911306-03-0 Purchase price: £30.00 UK Publisher: Dewi Lewis Publishing Website: http://www.dewilewis.com A fascinating and insightful look at the peculiarities of the British in the 1970’s. Are we any different now? In this book, Homer travels the country documenting arcane events which, as the title suggests, only happen once a year. If you are interested in documenting the British this is a splendid book to purchase. The pages cover events from January to December spread over a few years in the 1970’s. The resulting images document the strangeness of the British, mainly English, and also reveal life as it was lived 40 years ago. The style is photojournalistic with a strong nod towards ‘Picture Post’. A lovely nostalgic book. Coincidentally I had covered the Haxey Hood  – the event on the first page – some 40 or so  years after Homer was there.You can …